Task 1 Investigating Patterns in Earth’s Climate In this activity, you’ll use d

Task 1
Investigating Patterns in Earth’s Climate
In this activity, you’ll use data to determine how the Sun,
atmosphere, and hydrosphere influence Earth’s global climate patterns.
Part A
You’ll start by investigating how Earth’s surface temperature varies. Open https://app.edmentum.com/redirect//355987, and click on Data Set in the top left corner of the page. Within the Atmosphere category, select All Data, then
select Temperature. Now, select Monthly Air Surface Temperatures. After the new map appears on
your screen, select the Animate option near the top of the page, and then select OK to see the
animation. Set the time range on the animation for the most recent five years, and then click Submit. You can control the speed of the animation with the controls beneath the map.
Question 1
Describe patterns you observe in Earth’s surface temperature. How do these patterns change during the course of a year and from year to year? Use lines of latitude and degrees Celsius in your
description.
Question 2
What causes the variations in Earth’s surface temperature during the course of a year at a given
location? What causes the similar temperature bands that repeat from year to year?
Part B
Next you’ll investigate how precipitation varies throughout Earth. Visit the My NASA Data website and select Data Set in the top left corner. Within the Hydrosphere category, select All Data. Within All data category select Precipitation, and then select Monthly Precipitation. After the new map appears,
select Animate near the top of the page, and then select OK to see the animation. Set the time range on the animation for the most recent five years, and then click Submit. You can control the speed of
the animation with the controls beneath the map.
Question 1
Describe patterns you see in the precipitation on Earth. How do these patterns change during the
course of a year and from year to year? Use lines of latitude and the amount of precipitation in
millimeters/day (mm/day) in your description.
Question 2
What causes the variations in Earth’s precipitation during the course of a year or from year to year at a given location?
Part C
The last climate factor you’ll investigate is cloud coverage. Visit the My NASA Data webpage and
select Data Set in the top left corner. In the Atmosphere category, select Clouds, then select Monthly Low Cloud Coverage. After the new map appears, select Animate near the top of the website, and then select OK to see the animation. Set the time range on the animation for the most recent five years, and then click Submit. You can control the speed of the animation with the controls beneath the
map.
Question 1
Describe the patterns in Earth’s low cloud coverage. How do these patterns change during the course of a year and from year to year? Use lines of latitude and the percentage of cloud coverage in your
description.
Question 2
What causes the variations in Earth’s cloud coverage during the course of a year and from year to
year at a given location?
Task 2
Presenting a Persuasive Argument
In this activity, you’ll use presentation software to create a
presentation of 10 to 15 slides that predicts how Earth’s climate zones (polar, temperate, and tropical) will change over the next century. You’ll use what you learned about the climate zones in Task 1. Your presentation should answer these questions:
Which types of climactic events do you predict will alter the climate zones?
How will climate zones be affected?
What evidence from online or other sources
supports your predictions?
How might changing climate zones affect the plants and animals that live
in them?
Follow the steps provided to plan and create your persuasive presentation. Do additional
research if necessary and use this guide to writing a persuasive argument.
Part A:
Forming a Thesis
A thesis statement is the central idea of your argument. It should be focused and
provide answers to the question, What am I trying to claim? It should tell listeners how you think
Earth’s climate zones will change over the next century. Write your thesis statement in the answer
space.
Part B:
Developing Your Arguments
Claims form the basis of an argument. They’re detailed statements that
you must prove. Consider how you’ll support your claims with evidence using credible sources such as My NASA Data and NASA Climate Time Machine. You can use other reliable sources as well.
Write
down two or three claims for your argument and include evidence to support each of your claims. Cite the sources for your evidence using a URL address or book or journal title.
Part C:
Organize Your Information
After forming a thesis and identifying your claims and supporting evidence, create an outline for your presentation in the answer space. Include an introduction, at least three
supporting claims, and a conclusion. Be sure to state your thesis in the introduction.
Part D:
Select Audio and Video
An audiovisual presentation uses pictures and words to clearly present
information. These tips will help you effectively build your presentation:
Limit text on your slides:
Insert the key words or phrases highlighting your points instead of typing your entire speech on the
slide.
When possible, use pictures instead of words: Use representative figures such as pictures,
graphs, and charts to depict information or evidence rather than huge blocks of text.
Fill in your
speaker’s notes: Presentation software includes a notes section where you can add speaker’s notes
for your own reference. In this section, you can include all the details you want to cover without
showing them on your slides. Your speaker’s notes should be clear and coherent enough so that
someone else could deliver the presentation to an audience. You must complete your speaker’s notes to get full credit for the assignment.
List two to three audio, video, or photo resources that you wish
to use in your presentation and paste them in the answer space.
Part E:
Create and Deliver Your Presentation
Use your outline and the materials you’ve researched to create your presentation. It should contain 10 to 15 slides. Be sure to proofread and revise your writing to
catch any errors in grammar, spelling, logic, or cohesion. Remember that you must add speaker’s
notes.
Follow your teacher’s instructions for delivering your presentation. Your teacher may ask you
to record the presentation in the presentation software, or present it to a live audience. Be sure to
rehearse your presentation before you present or record it.
Make sure you complete the presentation within the time allotted. Speak audibly, and articulate your words clearly. Maintain eye contact with
your audience or the camera throughout the presentation.

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